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High blood pressure (Hypertension)

Hypertension or high blood pressure benefits enormously from hypnotherapy as becoming calm and relaxed are very important in affecting this condition, and that's without getting into the 'psycho-neuro' direct influence aspect of the mind under hypnotherapy, working in the same way as an expert meditator or guru can affect their own heartbeat.

From the research below...

“Results show that hypnosis is effective in reducing blood pressure 
in the short term but also in the middle and long terms.” (Gay) 

"The results suggest both replication with a larger sample and the value 
of adding self-hypnosis to the standard medical treatment for hypertension". (Raskin)

 

Gay, Marie-Claire. (Jan 2007). Effectiveness of Hypnosis in 
Reducing Mild Essential Hypertension: A One-Year Follow-Up. 
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, Vol 
55(1), 67-83. 

The present study investigates the effectiveness of hypnosis in reducing mild 
essential hypertension. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to hypnosis 
(standardized, individual 8-session hypnosis treatment) or to a control group (no 
treatment). Results show that hypnosis is effective in reducing blood pressure in the 
short term but also in the middle and long terms. We did not find any relationship 
between the practice of self-hypnosis and the evolution of blood pressure or 
between anxiety, personality factors, and therapeutic results. The implications of the 
results of the psychological treatment of hypertension are discussed. 


Borckardt, Jeffery J. (Apr 2002). Case Study Examining the Efficacy 
of a Multimodal Psychotherapeutic Intervention for Hypertension. 
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, Vol 
50(2), 189-201. 

Examined the effectiveness of a multimodal psychotherapeutic approach using 
hypnosis in the treatment of a single case of hypertension (42-yr-old male). A 
systematic eclectic conceptualization and treatment approach was implemented 
using psychodynamic, behavioural, and cognitive-behavioural elements. Hypnosis 
was used to support each of the treatment modalities. Time-series analysis 
procedures indicate that the psychological interventions were associated with 
significantly reduced diastolic blood pressure. Additionally, the effect of the 
psychological interventions was significant over and above traditional 
pharmacological interventions. However, psychotherapeutic interventions had no 
substantial impact on systolic pressure. The flexibility of hypnosis as a therapeutic 
tool is discussed in terms of potential advantages in treatment. 


Raskin, Richard; Raps, Charles; Luskin, Frederic; Carlson, Rosemarie; 
Cristal, Robert. (Oct 1999). Pilot Study of the Effect of Self-hypnosis 
on the Medical Management of Essential Hypertension. Stress 
Medicine, Vol 15(4), 243-247. 

Thirty-three medical patients diagnosed as hypertensive whose blood pressures 
were normalized while they were hospitalized were often found to require upward 
titration of medication upon follow-up as outpatients. Self-hypnosis was taught to 1 
group of hospitalized patients; a 2nd group received equal attention and time to 
relax without the specified procedure; and a 3rd group was monitored with no 
intervention. On follow-up, the hypnosis group showed greater downward change 
in diastolic blood pressure than the monitored group, with the attention-only group 
in between. Additionally, no subjects in the hypnosis group required upward titration of 
medications. The results suggest both replication with a larger sample and the value 
of adding self-hypnosis to the standard medical treatment for hypertension.

 

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